Azure Static Web Apps – custom build and deployments

Despite Microsoft claims “First-class GitHub and Azure DevOps integration” with Static Web Apps, one is significantly easier to use than the other. Let’s take a quick look at how much features we’re giving up by sticking to Azure DevOps:

GitHubADO
Build/Deploy pipelinesAutomatically adds pipeline definition to the repoRequires manual pipeline setup
Azure Portal support
VS Code Extension
Staging environments and Pull Requests

Looks like a lot of functionality is missing. This however begs the question whether we can do something about it?

Turns out we can…sort of

Looking a bit further into ADO build pipeline, we notice that Microsoft has published this task on GitHub. Bingo!

The process seems to run a single script that in turn runs a docker image, something like this:

...
docker run \
    -e INPUT_AZURE_STATIC_WEB_APPS_API_TOKEN="$SWA_API_TOKEN" \
    ...
    -v "$mount_dir:$workspace" \
    mcr.microsoft.com/appsvc/staticappsclient:stable \
    ./bin/staticsites/StaticSitesClient upload

What exactly StaticSitesClient does is shrouded with mystery, but upon successful build (using Oryx) it creates two zip files: app.zip and api.zip. Then it uploads both to Blob storage and submits a request for ContentDistribution endpoint to pick the assets up.

It’s Docker – it runs anywhere

This image does not have to run at ADO or Github! We can indeed run this container locally and deploy without even committing the source code. All we need is a deployment token:

docker run -it --rm \
   -e INPUT_AZURE_STATIC_WEB_APPS_API_TOKEN=<your_deployment_token> 
   -e DEPLOYMENT_PROVIDER=DevOps \
   -e GITHUB_WORKSPACE="/working_dir"
   -e IS_PULL_REQUEST=true \
   -e BRANCH="TEST_BRANCH" \
   -e ENVIRONMENT_NAME="TESTENV" \
   -e PULL_REQUEST_TITLE="PR-TITLE" \
   -e INPUT_APP_LOCATION="." \
   -e INPUT_API_LOCATION="./api" \
   -v ${pwd}:/working_dir \
   mcr.microsoft.com/appsvc/staticappsclient:stable \
   ./bin/staticsites/StaticSitesClient upload

Also notice how this deployment created a staging environment:

Word of caution

Even though it seems like a pretty good little hack – this is not supported. The Portal would also bug out and refuse to display Environments correctly if the resource were created with “Other” workflow:

Portal
AZ CLI

Conclusion

Diving deep into Static Web Apps deployment is lots of fun. It may also help in situations where external source control is not available. For real production workloads, however, we’d recommend sticking with GitHub flow.